Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Is Your Child Getting a Good Writing Education?

Last week the title of this article caught my eye. 


Even though I'm not a parent, I had to read it. I yearned to know what those four questions were and ponder the possible answers my writers would offer their parents. 

Of course one needs to ask the right questions. I dare say these four hit the nail on the head.

Bottom line? I'm the one who determines whether my students are getting a good writing education or not, and if you teach writing, you determine that as well. 

So this is essentially a must-read article. 

Click on the title. You won't be sorry.



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8 comments:

  1. Hi Tammy~

    Thanks for the link to the article. Excellent reading! My goal this upcoming year is to broaden WHO kids are writing for so to see it on the list confirmed my need to do this.

    Another goal of mine is to have more fiction writing time. While we use (and I love Calkins) our curriculum doesn't include this genre for First Grade BUT we are looking to revise our curriculum on July 20th. What child doesn't love to make up stories? Although not in our curriculum, I've been using Squiggle Writing and such to allow some freedom but it's not the same.

    When I put on my author's hat and visit schools to do my "author visits" I always start off my asking who wants to be an author when they get older. (Of course acknowledging that they are all authors/illustrators now!) Some hands go up but most stare at the chapter books I've brought and say things like, "Writing that takes too much time." But when I go into ALL the genres they CAN write, hands start flying up. I'll say, "What's your favorite song?" When they answer, I say, "You can grow up and be a songwriter." I ask them who reads the back of cereal boxes and again, tell them that's an author's job. They love it! I even mention whatever hot and appropriate sports and movie star there is at the moment and mention how they need authors to run their social media accounts. Hands FLY up. I do the same for movies. "We can write Star Wars?" they ask. Someone has to! Kids truly are lacking in the understanding that you can and should write for many purposes and I've discovered that even kids who claim they hate to write, can find something that excites them! So of course that leads me to always remember that if kids are lacking in that understanding of writing for different genres, then we teachers need to make sure we're exposing/living the truth with them.

    Hope the above makes sense as I haven't had my tea yet and basically just rolled out of bed! :)

    Thanks, Tammy!

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    1. Lisa, thank yo for such a great response. I especially love what you said about your conversations with kids about all the genres authors like them can experience. Come to my school! :)

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  2. That was a great article. Thank you!
    I need to work on #3 ... Having the kids write to a wider audience. Something to think about over the next few weeks!

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    1. Barb, I would agree with that. I doubt I can ever think big enough when it comes to audience.

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  3. As always great food for thought. I also can do a better job of including these things into my writing program. I also like the idea of parents asking those questions. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Miss Trayers, yeah wouldn't it be interesting to ask parents to do this and take a survey of answers?

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  4. I was at an edtech camp yesterday that discussed #3- writing for different audiences. They talked about how important it was for students to write for more than just their teacher. Very relevant for today's world.

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    1. Lori, you should blog about that! Please!

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