Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Don't Sweat the Small Stuff

Don't sweat the small stuff.  This has become one of my classroom's mantras of late.  Even considering all of our past and present daily conversations about character, some classes have a handful of children who simply have a tendency to make big stuff out of small stuff.  You know what I mean, right?  The complaints about where someone is sitting, where someone is standing in line, how someone looked at someone else, etc. are more frequent than I'd prefer.  It's all small stuff and not worth sweating about.  One day in the midst of a small stuff moment, the saying "Don't sweat the small stuff" popped into my brain and since then I bring it up when one of these little moments happens.  I typically say, "That's small stuff" and we move on.  I decided it was worthy of a classroom book.  Each child drew a picture of something that was small stuff.  Here are a few pages.





As I was typing this post, I had the idea that next year I would probably start by making a Small Stuff/Big Stuff chart with the kids before making the book.  Considering we're still in the midst of dealing with this issue, we might still have to make that chart and super-size it! :)
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28 comments:

  1. This makes me laugh- it's great! We daily have to spend time on small stuff. Love that you made it into a book. :)
    Lori
    Conversations in Literacy

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    1. Lori, most everything is a book, right? If it drives me crazy, it's definitely worthy of a book!

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  2. I love this! Good thing to teach kids early!

    Laurie
    Chickadee Jubilee

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    1. Laurie, I agree. I'm still working on not sweating the small stuff. :)

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  3. What a great idea!!! We've been using Pete the Cat as a way to put that stuff into perspective but this is wonderful, too!! I will definitely be using this idea! Thank you!!
    Growing Firsties

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    1. Lisa, I love Pete for this too. We like "It's all good" in our classroom as well. :)

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  4. We talk about big and little problems daily!! Maybe if we put it in a book, they can at least have something to reference!! :) Love it!

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    1. Anonymous, sometimes it's nice to put the daily things into a book. You're right. It makes for a great reference! :)

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  5. Tammy, love this! We are talking about kid-sized and teacher-sized problems, and I'm thinking I'll have to add this book idea into the lesson plans. I put together a file for my class to make a T-chart on the topic, if you're interested! Thanks for sharing.
    - Amanda {avphilli@gmail.com}
    Inspired in Second

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    1. Amanda, thanks so much for coming by and letting me know this idea will fit what you're doing with your kids!

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  6. OK...your idea was a LIGHTBULB MOMENT for me. It makes perfect sense to have a book and/or anchor chart to help them understand what is small and what is big. Thanks for sharing your fabulous tip!
    ~Jane
    rsmiramo@smsd.org

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    1. Jane, those lightbulb moments are fun to have. I'm glad I was able to help.

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  7. I love this idea! Thanks so much for sharing!

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    1. Thanks Hilary. I'm glad that you found something useful here on my blog.

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  8. I love this idea! We are STILL working on Big Stuff vs. Small Stuff in second grade. EVERYTHING is a crisis to them. :)

    Casey
    Second Grade Math Maniac
    Second Grade Freebies

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    1. Casey, I'm not surprised second graders are still working on these things. Maybe by the time they're our age, they'll get it. :)

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  9. You always have the best ideas for shaping character in these young lives. I remember liking this mantra (and book) as an adult because it helps keep perspective.

    Thanks for another super tip that I can try today! :)
    Marie

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    1. Marie, usually my ideas for shaping character come out of frustration from something that's driving me crazy in the classroom. :) I'm glad others find it useful too.

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    1. Michelle, you're very welcome. Thanks for letting me know you like it.

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